The Science Bit from the NI Science Festival

20 minutes

Ulster Museum

free

Fun, family-friendly mini-science talks from the experts!

Fun, family-friendly mini-science talks from experts including Peter Hepper from Queen’s University Belfast, Samuel Forbes from the Oxford University Babylab and Suzanne Zeedyk from Dundee University.

Programme of talks on the day…

Title: Gobbledygook! (12 noon)

Suzanne Zeedyk, Dundee University and connected baby

Why do babies love baby talk?  And is it actually good for them?  Come and hear Dr. Suzanne Zeedyk explain why babies’ brains are tuned to the rhythm of baby talk, and why parents’ brains unconsciously know that. Yep, even gobbledygook build babies’ brains!  The more of that babies get in the first year, the better they will do when they hit primary school a few years later.

Title: Learning to speak, learning to grow (1pm)

Sam Forbes, Oxford University BabyLab

Description: How do we know what babies know? In this introductory talk from Oxford University BabyLab researcher Sam Forbes, we look at the basic words that babies might learn early on in life, and some of the patterns of word learning that are common. How many words does a child know? What kind of things do they like to say? How can we find out about this?

Title: Why do I like Greens? Because my mummy ate them when pregnant (2pm)

Peter Hepper, Queen’s University Belfast

DescriptionMany of the behaviours and preferences we have as babies, children and even adults have their roots in the time we spent in the womb.  Peter Hepper from Queen’s University Belfast will look at how our preferences are formed as a result of our mummy’s habits.  Does hearing music in the womb make us musical or send us to sleep?   What does the newborn and child remember from its time in the womb?  How much of our postnatal behaviour is determined before we are born?

Title: All gone! How babies learn to describe (3pm)

Sam Forbes, Oxford University BabyLab

Description: When we learn about objects, we learn that they have certain properties, for example an apple should be red or green, and if we are lucky, also big and juicy. Oxford University BabyLab researcher Sam Forbes investigates how babies know about properties such as size, shape and colour, and how that is related to language learning.

Event taking place in The Ulster Museum’s Lecture Hall.

NISF16

This event is in partnership with the Northern Ireland Science Festival. For more information click here.